Thursday, November 5, 2009

Ezra Pound's seminal influence modernism II Legacy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezra_Pound#Further_reading

http://www.yamaguchy.netfirms.com/7897401/pound_ezra/jeffmuss_1.html
Essay Jefferson And/Or Mussolini topic for a future post

http://www.yamaguchy.netfirms.com/7897401/pound_ezra/jeffmuss_1.html
Essay America, Roosevelt and the causes of the present war Another future post

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pisan_Cantos
The Cantos are arranged by topics and structure Another future post

Pound's centrality of influence on the modernist movement in 20th century poetry and literature was profound and of long and permanent duration, inclusive to but not limited to the following points as made in the wiki article:
  • vital role in the modernist revolution in 20th century literature in English
  • Hugh Kenner and Marjorie Perloff both asserted his pivotal influence in numerous traditions in experimental poetry in the 20th century (The Pound Era)
  • He essentially employed free verse in extended compositions , a medium which was to comport well with many artists in the importing their visions of this century and the timeline cosmically conceived whence the sources were often characterized as inspiration or inspired mathematics by Pound himself in The Spirit of Romance.
  • Ginsberg made an intense study of Pound's use of parataxis quote
  • He was a critic and promoters of many seminal figures in poetry and literature of the 20th Century: W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, H.D., Marianne Moore, Ernest Hemingway, D. H. Lawrence, Louis Zukofsky, Basil Bunting, George Oppen, and Charles Olson.
  • Immediately before the First World War Pound became interested in art when he was associated with the Vorticists, a term he coined. Pound did much to publicize the movement and was instrumental in bringing it to the attention of the wider public; he was particularly important in the artistic careers of Henri Gaudier-Brzeska and Wyndham Lewis. quote
  • As a translator, Pound did much to introduce Proven├žal and Chinese poetry to English-speaking audiences. For example, he helped popularize major poets such as Guido Cavalcanti and Du Fu. He revived interest in the Confucian classics and introduced the West to classical Japanese poetry and drama (the Noh theatre). He also translated and championed Greek, Latin and Anglo-Saxon classics and helped keep these alive for poets at a time when classical education and knowledge of Anglo-Saxon was in decline.
  • His facility and knowledge of these languages kept the classics and tradition as Eliot defines it in his essay Tradition and the Individual Talent alive.
  • His interest in music in the early 20's kept in proportion the need to be mindful of the symbiosis of music and free verse poetry.
  • His interest in mysticism and the occult would be a natural consequence of his other accomplishments. His work is still undocumented here.






Legacy
Because of his political views, his support of Mussolini, his
opposition to central banking, and his anti-Semitism, Pound acquired many
enemies throughout the second half of the twentieth century. Historians and
scholars generally agree, however, that he played a vital role in the modernist
revolution in
20th century
literature
in English. The location of Pound—as opposed to other writers
such as
T. S. Eliot—at the center of
the Anglo-American Modernist tradition was famously asserted by the critic
Hugh
Kenner
, most fully in his account of the Modernist movement The Pound Era.
The critic
Marjorie Perloff has
also insisted upon Pound's centrality to numerous traditions of 'experimental'
poetry in the 20th century
. As a poet, Pound was one of the first to
successfully employ
free verse in extended
compositions. His Imagist poems influenced, among others, the
Objectivists. The
Cantos and many of Pound's shorter poems were a touchstone for
Allen
Ginsberg
and other Beat poets; Ginsberg
made an intense study of Pound's use of
parataxis which had a major
influence on his poetry. Almost every 'experimental' poet in English since the
early 20th century has been considered by some to be in his debt.
As critic,
editor and promoter, Pound helped shape the careers of some of the 20th
century's most influential writers including
W. B.
Yeats
, T. S. Eliot, James
Joyce
, Wyndham Lewis, Robert
Frost
, William Carlos
Williams
, H.D., Marianne Moore, Ernest Hemingway, D. H.
Lawrence
, Louis Zukofsky, Basil
Bunting
, George Oppen, and Charles
Olson
. Immediately before the First World War Pound became
interested in art when he was associated with the
Vorticists,
a term he coined.
Pound did much to publicize the movement and was instrumental
in bringing it to the attention of the wider public; he was particularly
important in the artistic careers of Henri
Gaudier-Brzeska
and Wyndham Lewis.
As a
translator, Pound did much to introduce
Proven├žal and Chinese poetry to
English-speaking audiences. For example, he helped popularize major poets such
as
Guido Cavalcanti and Du Fu. He revived
interest in the
Confucian classics and
introduced the West to classical Japanese poetry and drama (the
Noh theatre). He also translated and
championed Greek,
Latin and Anglo-Saxon
classics and helped keep these alive for poets at a time when classical
education and knowledge of Anglo-Saxon was in decline.
In the early 1920s in
Paris, Pound became interested in music, and was probably the first serious
writer in the 20th century to praise the work of the long-neglected Venetian composer Antonio Vivaldi and to
promote early music generally. He
also helped the early career of George Antheil, and
collaborated with him on various projects. Pound was also interested in mysticism and
the
occult, but
biographers have only recently begun to document his work in those fields.

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